Healthcare may not be thought of as a rule of law issue, but when the right to free healthcare is violated by corruption, counterfeit medicines, or discrimination, innocent people suffer. A seed grant from the World Justice Challenge in 2013 allowed the Cameroon Healthcare Access Program to tackle corruption in the healthcare system, where patients do not receive the free medicines they need and are asked to pay bribes for free services. A recent update from the program shows how the program is raising awareness and advancing the rule of law in Cameroon.

Legally, citizens of Cameroon are granted free testing and treatment for HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, cholera, and other infectious diseases. However, some medical staff use extortion to force patients to pay extra for additional testing or send patients to multiple labs for duplicate testing to earn extra money. Others ask patients to purchase drugs outside health facilities, at high prices, that should have been available for free. These corrupt practices can often be life threatening for sick patients.

To counter this culture of corruption, the Cameroon Healthcare Access Program created a national coalition of multidisciplinary stakeholders committed to improving healthcare, especially in disadvantaged communities. The coalition includes government bodies, such as the Ministry of Public Health and the National Anti-Corruption Committee, as well as civil society organizations such as the Global Citizens' Initiative. Together, the coalition members are educating both healthcare employees as well as citizens about the laws regarding healthcare.

Cameroonian civil society members participate in workshop to create community behavior change towards establishing better health practices.

Workshops on healthcare laws, policies and practices are training health workers and focusing on the benefits of corruption-free clinics. The workshops are reaching health workers from multiple medical facilities and include staff ranging from doctors to medical technicians. The program is also educating citizens about their rights to healthcare, and uses public service announcements (PSAs) to teach them how to report violations. Their material was shared on four national television shows in Cameroon as well as radio broadcast. Click the link below to watch the broadcast.

 

 

******

Photo Credit:

1) medical center/Cameroon Healthcare 

2) workshop/Cameroon Healthcare

 

WJP Staff
title bar

Read More

title bar

Rede Wayuri is a network of 55 Indigenous communicators in the Rio Negro region of Brazil. Through their use of WhatsApp and local radio, they have not only reported on topics like illegal mining in the Amazon, but also distributed accurate information about the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccines.   At the World Justice Forum in The Hague this past June, Rede Wayuri was presented with the World Justice Project’s Rule of Law Award for their outstanding work in countering disinformation by bringing accurate, reliable information to 23 Indigenous peoples and 750 communities in five local languages and Portuguese. 

Read More

When I was taking off to attend my first World Justice Forum, I had every expectation that I would hear the brightest minds debating the most complex social issues of our time. I was ready to learn about challenges unknown to me, faced by communities outside of the United States. What I didn’t expect was to see so many effective and transformative solutions that had already been implemented across the globe. The Justice Expo was not a showcase of proposals, suggestions, or hypotheses. It was an inventors’ forum: a spectacular display of evidence that dramatic change and global healing are achievable through innovation.

Read More

During the World Justice Forum, Dr. Ahmad Sarmast, founder of the Afghanistan National Institute of Music (ANIM), called on the international community to save Afghan music, women musicians, and all Afghan musicians. He described the human rights that have been stripped away since the Taliban’s August 2021 takeover made Afghanistan a “silent nation.” You can read Dr. Sarmast’s full remarks from June 1, 2022, in The Hague below, edited for clarity, and watch a performance by ANIM students who now live in exile Portugal.  

Read More

As one of Cambodia’s first human rights defenders, Vandeth recently made the difficult decision to stay home when the World Justice Project invited 30 World Justice Challenge finalists to showcase their exemplary rule of law projects at the World Justice Forum in The Hague.

Read More