In February 2020, the WJP released the WJP Mexico States Rule of Law Index 2019-2020, the second edition of the only subnational index produced by the WJP and one of the most complete measurements of institutional performance in the country. This tool uses the same conceptual framework and methodology that the WJP has used in over 120 countries, to measure adherence to the rule of law in each of Mexico's 32 states, and now it is available in English.

This research presents new data and indicators, which are organized into eight factors and 42 sub-factors:

  1. Constraints on Government Powers
  2. Absence of Corruption
  3. Open Government
  4. Fundamental Rights
  5. Order & Security
  6. Regulatory Enforcement
  7. Civil Justice
  8. Criminal Justice

The WJP Mexico States Rule of Law Index uses information obtained first-hand from citizens to capture the voices of thousands of people in urban and rural areas in Mexico. Specifically, the Index uses over 600 variables generated from answers to a General Population Poll (GPP) of 25,600 people, answers to Qualified Respondents' Questionnaires (QRQs) administered to over 2,600 attorneys and experts in criminal law, civil law, labor law, and public health; and information produced by other institutions (third-party sources). 

The results of the WJP Mexico States Rule of Law Index 2019-2020 show that:

  • The states with the highest scores are Yucatán (0.46)1, Aguascalientes (0.45), and Zacatecas (0.43). The states with the lowest scores are Guerrero (0.33), Puebla (0.35), and Quintana Roo (0.35).
  • Between the 2018 and 2019-2020 versions of the Index, scores increased in 15 states, decreased in 11, and remained unchanged in 6.
  • Scores for Factor 5: Order and Security, decreased in 19 states.
  • Scores for Factor 1: Constraints on Government Powers, increased in 26 states.

The potential for application and impact of this Index is broad. It is a tool that may be used by legislators, civil society organizations, academia, and the media, among others, to identify strengths and weaknesses in each state, and promote public policies that strengthen the rule of law in Mexico.

Download the Index report in English and Spanish below, as well as a document with the most important findings in Spanish (English coming soon). Also, explore the interactive data at index.worldjusticeproject.mx, and learn more about the Index on our YouTube page. 

 

 

 


Scores range from 0 to 1, with 1 indicating the strongest adherence to the rule of law

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