PolicyWest 2020: Peace and Justice in the Time of COVID

 

WJP’s Ted Piccone joined speakers Bonnie Jenkins and Erin Bromaghim at Pacific Council’s PolicyWest 2020 virtual conference on December 3 for a panel discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic has compounded the challenges to achieving SDG 16: "Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions."

Pacific Council’s PolicyWest 2020

Peace and Justice In the Time of COVID-19 | Thursday, December 3

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet. Its foundation is built on 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call to action by all countries—developed and developing—in a global partnership.

    SDG 16: "Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions" articulates the key role that good governance and the rule of law play in promoting peaceful, just, and inclusive societies. As a continuing component of the Goalmakers project, this panel convened to discuss how the pandemic has compounded the challenges to achieving SDG 16. Going into 2021, access to justice for marginalized populations, combating corruption, and government accountability are just a few of the mainstays critical to achieving peace and upholding the rule of law around the world, as COVID-19 and its effects continue to ravish communities. This conversation will explore how to overcome these obstacles and implement solutions at home and abroad.

    Speakers:

    • Ted Piccone, Chief Engagement Officer of the World Justice Project
    • Bonnie Jenkins, founder and executive director of the Women of Color Advancing Peace, Security, and Conflict Transformation
    • Erin Bromaghim, Director of Olympic and Paralympic Development, Los Angeles Mayor’s Office (moderator)

    Learn more about the Twin Crises of Public Health and the Rule of Law in WJP’s recent policy brief series:

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